Let’s Make This World More Accessible And Inclusive For Disabled Persons

We humans inherently have a naturally prejudiced mindset. From an early age, we are socialized to believe that people with disabilities are not as good as others and should be treated differently. This idea of disability being a barrier to a person’s success is heavily ingrained in the minds of many people, including those who are disabled themselves.

This blog post will review ways to make the world more accessible and inclusive for people with disabilities. Find out how we can become a more empathetic society, teach kids to be more inclusive, and harness technology to make jobs accessible!

What is Disability?

According to the World Health Organization, disability is a limitation in activity or function because of an impairment in body structure or function. This can be caused by physical, mental, or sensory impairments.

There are many types of disabilities, and they can range from mild to severe. Some common types of disabilities include:

  • Physical disabilities: These impairments affect a person’s ability to move their body or parts of their body. Examples include paralysis, amputation, and cerebral palsy.
  • Mental disabilities: These impairments affect a person’s cognitive functioning and can make it difficult for them to think clearly, remember things, or concentrate. Examples include Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, and schizophrenia.
  • Sensory disabilities: These impairments affect a person’s ability to see, hear, smell, taste, or feel things. Examples include blindness, deafness, and partial paralysis.

How do we become more empathetic and inclusive towards disabled persons?

We become more empathetic and inclusive by understanding and accepting that everyone is different and that these differences should be celebrated. We should also be willing to learn from others, especially those with different lived experiences. This means being open-minded, flexible, and patient.

When we interact with someone who has a disability, it is important to remember that they are just like us–they have hopes, dreams, and feelings.

Just because someone has a disability does not mean they are any less of a person or that they do not deserve the same respect and dignity as everyone else.

We can also become more empathetic and inclusive by attempting to create a more inclusive world for everyone. This includes things like ensuring that public spaces are accessible for all, providing captioning or translations for events and materials, using plain language when communicating, and being an ally for marginalized groups.

How can technology help people with disabilities?

Technology has come a long way in recent years and has made many everyday tasks easier for people with disabilities. Here are some ways that technology can help people with disabilities:

  • Communication: There are many communication tools available that can help people with disabilities communicate more easily. For example, there are apps that can convert speech to text, or text to speech, which can be helpful for those who have difficulty speaking or writing. There are also video call apps available that can be used to communicate with others face-to-face, even if you’re not able to meet in person.
  • Mobility: There are now many devices available that can assist with mobility, such as electric wheelchairs, scooters, and standing frames. There are also GPS systems available that can help people with visual impairments get around more easily.
  • Education: Technology can also be used to improve access to education for people with disabilities. For example, there are now many online courses available that can be accessed from anywhere at any time. There are also specialized software programs available that can make it easier for people with learning difficulties to access educational material and participate in learning activities.
  • Work: Technology can also help disabled people take part in the workforce by providing them with the tools they need to do their job effectively. For example, there is now specialist software available that can assist people who are blind or have low vision to use computers and carry out work tasks. There are also many devices available that can help people with physical disabilities to carry out work tasks more easily, such as voice-controlled software or ergonomic keyboards.

How can kids learn to be more inclusive towards disabled persons?

It is estimated that one in seven people in the world has some form of disability, making disabled persons one of the largest minority groups. Despite this, disabled persons are often left out of conversations about diversity and inclusion. This needs to change.

There are many ways that kids can learn to be more inclusive towards disabled persons.

One way is through education. It is important that kids are taught about disabilities from a young age so that they can understand and respect the challenges that disabled persons face. Schools can create an inclusive environment by ensuring that all students have the opportunity to participate in activities and by providing accommodations for students with disabilities.

Another way for kids to learn about inclusivity is through exposure to disabled persons in their community. If kids see disabled persons living full and happy lives, it will help them to understand that disability does not have to be a barrier to success or happiness. There are many ways to get involved in your community, such as volunteering at a local disability-inclusive organization or simply getting to know your neighbors who have disabilities.

The most important thing is for kids to feel comfortable talking about disability and inclusion. When we open up the conversation, we can help break down the barriers that exist between disabled and non-disabled persons.

Conclusion

There is no excuse for not making the world more accessible and inclusive for disabled persons. With a little creativity and effort, we can make sure that everyone can enjoy the same opportunities and experiences. We hope that you’ll join us in this effort to make the world a better place for everyone. Thank you!

This blog post is part of ‘International Day of Person’s with Disability’ blog hop hosted by Sakshi Varma (tripleamommy) #IDPDbloghop2022.

Penned by:

Mayura Amarkant

Copyright ©MayuraAmarkant. This article is the property of DiaryOfAnInsaneWriter. Any unauthorized use or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Mayura Amarkant (DiaryOfAnInsaneWriter). With the right and specific direction to the original content.

21 comments

  1. I had never thought about how tech could increasingly be used to make everything more inclusive for the disable, thankyou for pointing out its importance. I dont think we need to teach kids anything when it comes to inclusivity, they dont discriminate inherently. They learn it from adults around them

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nice post on how we can be more empathetic and compassionate towards disabled people. It is of utmost importance that we treat everyone equally and without any prejudice. Nice of you to add the technology element. Keep the good work going.

    #ContemplationOfaJoker #Jokerophilia

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Disability can be of anything, it can be physical, mental, or emotional. It can be something that is temporary or permanent. It can be something that limits a person’s ability to do certain things or participate in certain activities. Disability can also be something that makes a person more vulnerable to certain risks or less able to cope with certain situations. In fact what I mean to convey is that not being inclusive and judging others on the basis of their physical limitations is also a disability…. rather if this particular one is fixed all will be settled.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Such a wonderful article! Not only did you add valuable information for those who know little about people with disabilities, but you somehow also gave suggestions on how to help others do their part to make things more accessible as well. I hope more people would be inspired to do their somehow give people with disabilities a chance to live a more normal life.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Such a wonderful article! Not only did you add valuable information for those who know little about people with disabilities, but you somehow also gave suggestions on how to help others do their part to make things more accessible as well. I hope more people would be inspired to do their somehow give people with disabilities a chance to live a more normal life.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Thanks Mayura for sharing a comprehensive framework on how inclusion can be implemented at large.

    I loved two core ideas from your blog –
    A. Everyone is different and these differences should be celebrated.
    B. Sensitizing kids from early age about disabilities so that they can understand and respect the challenges that disabled persons and their families face.

    I liked the fluidity in your approach that shows clarity of thought. Kudos 👍

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Very informative post Mayura. I myself experienced technology and its benefits for the specially abled and their needs. Being aware, mindful, accepting, and inclusive are just a few things needed As conscious parents, teaching and making our kids understand is one very nice thing you shared.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I sometimes wonder if kids need to be taught to be empathetic towards PWDs .if we are simply open and approachable towards all kids, I’m guessing kids will also learn from us, but you will know better as a mom whether that holds true or not.i completely agree with you that kids can sure be the ticket to a more inclusive society

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Mayura, your points about inclusion at an early age as well as appropriate use of technology are spot on. Schools can play such big role in breaking barriers, common playgrounds, so many simple shifts can help us be more empathetic and inclusive.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Loved the rather comprehensive list on technology and how it can help people with different needs. I guess the challenge is figuring out how to ensure that technology is accessible and affordable for people with disabilities. Wondering if you have encountered any good examples of the same. Would be curious to hear more.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. “We should also be willing to learn from others, especially those with different lived experiences.” Very truly written – and it is this diversity that makes our lives rich. Also shared some good points about how improved technology can improve access for persons with a disability.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. “There are many ways to get involved in your community….or simply getting to know your neighbors who have disabilities.” Such a great advice. I live in an apartment complex with 300 other families and I am known as my son’s mom. Madhav’s mom. and everyone seems to know him or know of him and that he is different. I think being curious about someone’s disability is not at all wrong and also what you ask.. just the intentions must be nice 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  13. What I like best about your blog is the stress on making children comfortable to talk about disability. If anything, I think this can include adults as well!! I don’t know too many adults who are comfortable even asking a person about his or her disability. They just don’t seem to know how to ask!! Either they ignore or they avoid. Perhaps the child can be the father of the man here as well 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  14. You are right in pointing out creating sensitivity right from the school time. Children absorb prejudices like sponge, let’s create a sensitive atmosphere for them to absorb.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I love what you have written about accepting and celebrate differences. I would go further to say that differences are essential to human progress. Some of the most brilliant people are autistic. Their brain being differently wired has made it possible for them to see solutions that neurotypicals can’t. Given that the world needs so many many different skills, what neurodivergent people bring to the table is truly rare and therefore special. Neurodiversity is not an inconvenience, it’s a necessity. So by making the world inclusive and accessible, we are doing only ourselves a favour!!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Thanks Mayura for this blog. Great tips on use of technology to assist those with specific disabilities. We all should be mindful of them. Also, couldn’t agree more on introducing ‘inclusion’ to children- when they are still unconditioned and can take to it naturally

    Like

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